Movie Themes and Underscores – AKM Music Review

AK169 AK170  title
AK169 Emotive World & AK170 Nature Soundscapes

Copyright Free Movie Themes and Underscores – AK169 & AK170

I’ve had these two AKM Music copyright-free albums sitting waiting to be reviewed for a few weeks now. Whilst sharing similar characteristics, they do vary quite a bit in their application. AK169 Emotive World is, to me, a movie theme track album. Whilst there are tunes on there that could be used underneath narration I think this one is ideal when your looking for music to go on top and drive your visuals. AK170 Nature Soundscapes is more of an album of narrative underscores or possibly musical wallpaper when you want the images to tell the story in their own.

AK169 Emotive World

This album is all about big themes, mainly orchestral but there’s a few with a definite oriental feel to them. The first few tracks conjured up visions of big screen blockbusters but there’s also a smattering of tracks that could be used on corporates and commercials. Lots of voice effects here if you’re looking for some!

01 Main Theme – 3’16”
Medium slow, repetitive orchestral piece with swirling start and building with stabbing strings and voice effects. It conjured up a victory scene from one later Terminator films, with a hint of electronic FX here and there.

02 Black Wing – 3′
Back with the Terminator here. He said he would be! This could be used on the opening title sequence for the film or a scene where he rebuilds from being almost totally wiped out. There’s voice effects again on this one, with a slow beating of a huge timpani drum to create building tension. Nice dramatic ending to lead you into narrative.

03 Blue Moon – 2’36”
I was expecting something equally spacey on this but it’s an odd one. It starts with an electronic trumpet voluntary and gets all mixed up after that. There’s a horribly repetitive electronic stab which doesn’t seem to go away and eventually breaks into a chorus of electronic strings and odd sounding instruments (a bit like broken trumpets). Not my favourite.

04 Crisis of the City – 3’27”
Orchestral, menacing – with swirling electronic strings which create an image of desperation and destruction. Oh hang on, there’s another voice effect, this time a male choir giving it a ‘heave ho!’ type effect. This soon fades though and we’re back to this medium-paced big orchestral piece. Could fit equally well on a bank commercial as it could on a big blockbuster sci-fi or war film.

05 – Emotional – 3′
Poor attempt at a sad gypsy violin opening. If it was there to conjure up the emotions then it failed, and I’m not really sure where or how you’d use this one.

AK169 Emotive World
AK169 Emotive World

06 Kingdom of Children – 2’47”
Now they’ve got their electronic harp out and mixed that with what sounds like a young person’s voice effect and a harpsichord. It’s a simple tune this one, which makes it usable on all manner of films – especially those depicting kids.

07 Last Battle – 4’07”
Think of all the previous tracks and edit them together. Lots of voice effects, string stabs and big orchestral sound. Goes on a bit!

08 Morning – 2’19”
The rythym is building on this one with a big wind section chorus. I can imagine someone flying.

09 Ancient Drum – 2’12”
Hear them jungle drums man! Well it actually starts with a Japanese taiko drum and gong sound but soon breaks out into a wild tropical jungle beat. This could be a really useful track if you were looking to cut something at a really fast pace.

10 Osaka – 3’15”
Slow with a strong steady big-drum beat. Definite oriental feel about it, with chorus line played on a shakuhachi wooden flute. Orchestral strings build and finally lead you out as a solo.

11 Red Sky – 2’46”
Slow piano start, with orchestra sections dropping in one by one. And yes, you’ve guessed it, a choir of voices brought in for good measure. You can’t work out what they’re saying but it’s a feature that might preclude you from using the track. It ends on the piano, back on its own playing out it’s repetitive tinkle.

12 Santan – 2’09”
Indistinguishable from the last one really, but a bit more of a Celtic sound and without the voices.

13 Sky – 3’58”
Big orchestral piece with crashing cymbal sounds and horn sections. Eventually the voice effects come in and make you realise you’re on the same album. Could imagine this being used on a bank commercial.

14 Sunday – 2’03”
Violin opening sequence – obviously electronic but with a melancholy feel to it. Big drum and orchestral stabs and chorus pieces lift you up as the track moves along. No idea why its called ‘Sunday’.

15 Taiko – 2’08”
As the title suggests, we’re back with the Japanese Taiko drums this time but a lot less ‘jungle’ – more pure Taiko. A really useful track to have on hand if you are trying to get a really Japanese feel to something. Nice bamboo bashing to cut to.

16 Tear – 2’24”
So sad – so very sad! Reminded me a bit of Hushabye Mountain from Chitty Chitty Bang Bang when it started, but soon fell into the same orchestra and voice effect pattern of other tracks in this album.

AK170 Nature Soundscapes

An excellent mix of mood-creating and enhancing tracks to add to landscapes. Each track has at least three variations of the main theme including a short sting and alternative cut. Quite of a few of these would work really well as a background track to narration. Nothing will offend you too much, and some of the alternate versions are very different to the main, yet recognisably similar. This could make them ideal for a longer-form documentary.

01/02/03/04 Above the Clouds – 5’54” / 2’43” / 19″ / 12″
This would work well on a scene filmed from a drone over highlands, valleys and streams. A slow piano-led piece with highlights in flute and string.

05/06/07 Blue Lagoon – 3’39 / 3’09” / 14″
Again, quite a slow piece but has much more of an electronic feel to it. Wispy short electronic stabs and a twiddling keyboard underscore take you along. This is pretty non-specific, so could be used as a background for narrative quite easily. The alternate version (06) is a bit more electronic and less detailed – making it even more usable for a narrative underscore.

AK170 Nature Soundscapes
AK170 Nature Soundscapes

08/09/10 Deep Forest Sunrise – 4’19” / 3’16” / 25″
A little more upbeat this time, but still with an electronic sound which has swirling keyboard effects and a driving electronic beat. An occasional subtle voice effect breaks in and slows the whole thing down before breaking back into the beat. The alternate version is a lot more melodic and slow with a piano lead.

11/12/13 Navaho Plain – 2’45” / 2’45” / 22″
Think Native American prairie with a hint of Celtic tribe and you’ll have this one. Flute and swirling orchestral sounds will take you to a misty morning somewhere – with birds flying high over a silent landscape. The alternative version is very similar, but with a more pronounced flute sequence.

14/15/16 Rising Sun – 4’11” / 2’21” / 19″
This starts with an eerie distant drumming sound before breaking into strings and subtle flute. The beat then lifts with an acoustic guitar lead with a bit of a Spanish sound to it. The alternate version is a bit more reliant on the drum beat and has a bit more of an electronic feel to it.

17/18/19 The Moon Appears – 6’12” / 3’03” / 17″
This one starts with a constant, slow deep swirling sound with distant strings and wind instruments. You can imagine drifting over a sea of ice during the first part of this. Gradually more definition is added with tubular bells, big string section and voice effects. The rhythm kind of creeps up on you. Reminded me of Bladerunner in parts. Alternative version is much simpler and more flute than anything else.

Kevin Cook F.Inst.V. (Hon)

Note: 20% off either the CD or CD DOWNLOAD with this promo code ‘HDSLR1’. All AKM Music’s albums and single-track download music can be previewed on their website – AKMMusic.co.uk

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Video Artisan – more than just Marketing Films

SliceStoppa marketing films title
Its not just marketing films now from Video Artisan
SliceStoppa box design
SliceStoppa box design

We’ve recently launched a series of short marketing films produced for SliceStoppa – but this project extended way beyond our usual sphere of film and video production. SliceStoppa’s Managing Director, Ian Joyce and fellow product designer, Gary Cant, approached us whilst the product was still in the design stage and engaged us to create the SliceStoppa logo, packaging, business stationery, photography and, in association with my colleague, Martin Baker, the company’s eCommerce website.

Like many companies, SliceStoppa knew that marketing films would play a vitally important role in getting their amazing golf training aid to market. Not only do marketing films lend themselves perfectly to demonstrating the unique selling features of products like SliceStoppa, but they also play a vital role in search engine optimisation. Producing a series of marketing films was therefore uppermost in their minds from day one. Furthermore, apart from direct sales from their own website (www.SliceStoppa.co.uk) the company also knew that wholesalers and retailers of their product would demand marketing films to include on their own websites.

Whilst Video Artisan regularly creates graphics and animated logo sequences for marketing films, this is the first time that we have been commissioned to design an original logo and branding for a business from scratch. The benefit of this was that we could design a logo that would work equally well on paper, online and on video from the outset. The benefit for SliceStoppa was that they could work with one local agency and know that there wouldn’t be any conflicts between differing agencies or design objectives.

SliceStoppa explained

SliceStoppa is a golf training aid that helps golfers to develop the perfect golf swing and approach to the golf ball. It can also be used for a number of other training drills to help with chipping, putting and removing leg slide on the downward swing. It can be used equally well on the driving range, practice tee, golf course or at home – and is suited to both left and right-handed golfers.

SliceStoppa in use
SliceStoppa – stills taken from marketing films

SliceStoppa is compact, impact resistant and incredibly easy to set up and use. Within minutes of introducing SliceStoppa to your regular golf practice you’ll see a vast improvement in your golf swing and will start hitting your golf ball further and straighter. It is available now direct from the SliceStoppa website at only £29.99.

The three SliceStoppa marketing films

The three marketing films were produced primarily for delivery from SliceStoppa’s website and are hosted on their YouTube channel (and also Video Artisan’s Vimeo channel). These consist of a general introduction to SliceStoppa, a short ‘teaser’ promo and a short film that explains what a golf slice is and how SliceStoppa helps golfers remove slicing and hooking from their game.

Introducing SliceStoppa

What is a Slice?

SliceStoppa Teaser

These marketing films were shot at three locations, including Topgolf at Chigwell, Ilford Golf Club and also outside the Video Artisan studio here in Loughton, Essex. Filming took around two days to complete and around three days to edit. Apart from one Action Camera shot on the teaser film, all material was shot using a Canon 5D DSLR. This is also the first instance where we have voiced the video ourselves too – but not until after the client had auditioned a number of voiceover artists.

Further Marketing Films

Within a week of being launched the initial interest in the product has been excellent and it has already been taken up by Groupon where it is selling really well. The website has also attracted interest from other golf retailers, golf professional and other specialist retailers. Once product sales increase SliceStoppa have plans to produce further marketing films to demonstrate the additional drills which the product can be used for.

If you have new or existing products that could benefit from marketing films, or you would like to hear about our complete marketing services, please do not hesitate to contact us.

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Shooting a holiday lip-dub

It must be love lip-dub title
The story behind the Lip-dub

Just to prove this job of mine isn’t really work I decided to produce a fun video whilst on holiday this year. It’s a lip-dub or musical mime, performed by a group of friends and I whilst we vacated on the amazing island resort of Cayo Levantado just off the Samana Bay on the Dominican Republic. I’m not really sure why I’m sharing this with you on my business blog but I’ve had so many questions about how it was done, and why, so maybe this will satisfy everyone. To those that have not seen it here it is, and if you want to know more about how this lip-dub was produced please read on.

The Lip-dub motivation

First of all I need to quickly tell you the back story behind this holiday. When the website Friends Reunited was in its heyday, I signed up and made contact with a whole bunch of old school friends – some dating back to my infant school days. The usual reunions took place; starting off with tens of people turning up but gradually dwindling down to little more than a handful of us who reformed their friendships and have continued to meet up on a monthly basis ever since.

It was on one of these booze-fuelled nights out that we pledged that in the year we reached 50 we would all go on a special holiday together, with partners, to somewhere exotic. We had originally decided on a cruise and started a joint savings account to pay for it. Like many great plans for one reason or another this did not materialise. However, the whole idea was rekindled when one of our group, Karen, announced that she was going to get married to Paul (the couple in the penultimate shot of the film) and some bright spark suggested that maybe we should join them on their honeymoon – and the rest is history.

I’m not sure at what point I decided to shoot a film whilst we were away but it was certainly months before we left. This gave me time to think about what I wanted to create and to pick a song that would mean something to everyone involved. This isn’t the first lip-dub I’ve shot but it’s certainly the most detailed and most labour intensive – but I have to admit that I really like doing them. Most of my time is spent producing corporate videos for other people, with a precisely defined objective. This was produced purely for fun and as a memento for all of us of this very special holiday.

Lip-dub pre-planning and musical choice

There’s no doubt that the 7 P’s play their part in shooting a lip-dub (Proper Planning and Preparation Prevents Piss Poor Performance). This doesn’t only mean having a pretty good idea about what you are going to film and making sure you have the kit to do it, but also making sure that everyone involved knows what’s expected of them.

Labi's digital remastered album
Labi’s digital remastered album

The track, ‘It must be love’ was certainly a favourite amongst us but probably more so in the version sung by Madness. That was our era and we’d all been away together before on a Madness weekend at Butlins. However, that version didn’t really lend itself to a lip-dub but the original by Labi Siffre certainly does (to me anyhow). Choosing a song that we were all familiar with was important, but even so I’d urged everyone in the months beforehand to brush up on the lyrics. That’s probably my first tip to anyone thinking of doing something similar – make sure your talent knows the words! This worked for me, well maybe not in one person’s case who had spent weeks memorising, ‘All you need is love’ – which only came to light when we started filming with the complaint that, “I don’t even like the Beatles Cookie!” You came good in the end though Deb! : )

I’d put together a rough shot list and shared this with the group. I knew I wasn’t going to stick to this religiously but my aim was to make sure they understood what kind of commitment was going to be involved. The last thing you’ll need is talent moaning about having you taking them away from their holiday pleasures just to get another shot. I also wanted to make sure they understood that I wanted each of them to perform the entire song as a solo – from start to finish. I knew there was one or two shrinking violets among them but, on the whole, we’re always up for a laugh and I knew none of them would back down from the challenge. I tried to make it fun too – which is also important.

By doing this I knew (or hoped) I could cut to at least one good solo performance at any point within the song. Here’s a split screen showing all of our performances – which shows just how good (or bad) some of our individual miming turned out. Please keep in mind, I only gave each of them one chance to do their solo – so keep an eye open for the occasional slip.

I also got the entire group to perform the chorus line a few times at a few different locations – plus shot various GVs around the hotel to use as cover shots should I be short at the editing stage. I also asked each of the group to bring a small, heart-shaped prop with them which would be used somewhere within the film. This gave me the chance to give a little purpose to the GVs by placing each persons’ prop within the frame (seen towards the end of the film).

The only other props were the inflatable guitar and ukulele, bought from eBay for a couple of quid before we travelled and kindly repaired by the pool attendant when the bass developed a split! I knew these would be needed on the musical break in the middle of the song and primed Steve and Paul that I would need them to give that section of the song a good listen to.

Lip-dub filming kit

Even though there was a filming job to do on this holiday it was still supposed to be a holiday, so I had to cut my kit list back to the bare essentials so that we could still fit a full holiday wardrobe in our suitcases. Still, there were some things over and above a camera that I knew I’d need (or want) with me. The full list included:

  • Canon 550D (running Magic Lantern software)
  • Lenses (Tokina 11-16mm f2.8 / Vintage Fujinon 55mm f.18 / Vintage Fujinon 200mm f4)
  • Variable ND filter (too little lighting was never going to be a problem)
  • Handful of Canon batteries and a charger (I could have taken just a couple)
  • RODE video mic (this was never taken out of the case)
  • Lightweight photographic tripod (a very old one – see later)
  • Pico Flex Dolly (love it – with all my heart!)
  • Magic Arms (a couple – but one would have done)
  • JVC Adixxion Action Camera (for underwater shots)
  • SD Cards (took 4 but only used one 32Gb in Canon and one 16Gb in the JVC)

This lot was dispersed amongst our main cases and our hand luggage but still kept us within our weight limits. Everything arrived home safely afterwards – except the tripod which was pretty much knackered before it went away but completely so by the end of the shoot having spent some of the time stuck in the sand and sea. I wouldn’t have been without it though as I knew I wouldn’t want shaky hand-held shots – especially on the solos. I also wanted to be in the group shots myself so the camera needed to stand on its own at some point. The tripod was left in our hotel room bin as we checked out and probably occupies landfill space now. Even though I knew this would happen it was still sad as I’d had that tripod since the late 80’s. Maybe a Dominican has picked it up and making good use of it now.

Lip-dub tripod
Using a tripod – an essential lip-dub tool

I’d decided on the Canon 550D because I knew it could give me the look and quality I was after and was no bigger than a stills camera that I would take away normally. Also, whilst we wasn’t too bothered about what people were thinking of us as we were filming, a DSLR attracts far less attention than a conventional camera. We were often shooting amongst other guests and didn’t really want to cause them any concerns or raise any questions.

Canon 550D
Canon 550D with Fujinon 55mm f1.8 lens

The lens selection also had to be considered. The Tokina 11-16mm wide was my go-to lens most of the time, giving me an effective lens length of 17.6mm to 25.6mm on the 550D’s cropped sensor. The 55mm Fujinon was going to give me the equivalent of 88mm – so I didn’t really have a natural field of view lens with me (which is normally around 50mm). In practice, this meant having to position the camera back a bit more than I usually would in order to get my framing right. The 200mm Fujinon was taken just in case I needed a long shot, and was used only once in the film on one of the heart-shaped prop shots (I leave you to guess which one).

The variable ND was a must as I like to play with depth of field and the 55mm Fujinon, with its f1.8 aperture, needs a lot of knocking back when run fully open. This lens does get softer at the open end with the ND filter pretty much at its strongest, but I still love it. The lens also would prove useful should I want to shoot anything in low light. I didn’t – but I’d rather have it to hand if the needed. I certainly wasn’t going to take any kind of lighting away with me.

I did take the RODE mic with me but it wasn’t used. All the guide audio was recorded via the Canon’s internal mic, which though totally naff under normal circumstances, in this case I knew that I was never going to use the recorded sound on the finished video. The RODE was there just in case I was tempted to shoot anything other than the lip-dub – which I wasn’t.

Pico Flex
Pico Flex Dolly

The only bit of kit that might be considered as self-indulgent was the Pico Flex Dolly, but part of the drive to create this lip-dub was to serve my own creative desires. I simple love what a bit of temporal parallax brings to a film and the Pico Flex gave me the chance to have a play with it. There’s only a couple of shots that made it into the final edit in which this was used, but I still love them and wish I could have used it more. All you need with the Pico Flex is a good surface and the hotel had lots of nice smooth tables and marble floors for me to play on.

Managing the shoot

To end up with just over three minutes of usable material meant us shooting a little pretty much every day. I don’t think it took over the holiday for anyone but rather became an entertaining side attraction and topic of conversation. By the end of the holiday everyone seems to be really excited at how it was going to come together and at no time refused to take part or be the object of my amusement.

The three set-up scenes in the film (Ricky the bird man, 7-in a bed and Feet in bed) were all thought about beforehand but tweaked a bit on the day. We did try and get all nine of us on the bed at the same time but we couldn’t quite fit. Still, the bed sizes at the hotel were pretty impressive. My only regret here is that I should have shifted focus and rehearsed the 7-in a bed shot a few time. But it was a holiday after all.

Whenever the performers were miming or moving to the music I used my Samsung phone to play the music to them – either through its speaker just off camera when the environment wasn’t too noisy or via headphones when it was. I kind of set a precedent with this on my own solo which was self-framed with my wife, Tiffany, left to press the camera’s record button. I think we got away with it, though in an ideal world it would have been better to have the phone and headphones out of shot all the time.

The underwater shots were taken on my new toy, the JVC Adixxion camera which is waterproof down to 5m. This was also used on a couple of group shots and I think it stood up pretty well against the DSLR. The pool shots, with everyone doing the heart sign with their hands (in case you’d not worked that out) probably took the longest to do as some of us were having buoyancy problems. I’m not sure if this was down to too much fizzy beer or lunch, but keeping yourself low in the water and posing to the camera seemed to be a struggle. I also used the JVC to shoot the final sunset shot as a stills timelapse.

At the end of each day I would review the shots so by the time we got to the last few days I was confident that I had enough in the can – and the edit was starting to take place in my head. I have to admit that I was gagging to cut it by then.

Editing the lip-dub

The editing took me a couple of days in total using my Edius 6.5 system – including file transfers and working through all the rushes. In total there was about a 90-mins worth of material which is a high shoot-to-edit ratio but much of this was down to overrun on shooting solos and off the cuff shots that, with hindsight, just didn’t work.

The edit process was quite straight forward, working the solos first and syncing them to the music track. I’d first roughly line-up the music with the ambient sound on those takes where the headphones were not used, and purely by sight on those were the headphones were used. The only tricky parts came on Mick’s solo (shot by the hotel sign) where my phone handshaked with the hotel’s WIFI system causing the music to momentarily pause, and on Paul’s solo where he dropped the phone half way through his performance. This wasn’t any great hardship though.

edit suite
The Video Artisan edit suite

Refining the edits will always have to be carried out as regardless of how well your performer knows the lyrics they will always be a frame or two behind the actual singer. Just slipping the visuals back a notch normally sorts this out for the entire song. You’ve also got to accept that there will be one or two words which are just wrong, a point demonstrated in my own performance in the split screen example above. These were, in the main, hidden within the edit.

The hard part of the edit was deciding when enough was enough. Since releasing the video I’ve found myself going back to the rushes and doing an alternate edit but only for my own benefit and nothing that I would release in favour of the first cut.

Releasing the lip-dub

The ugly question of copyright was on my mind at the very early stages of planning this lip-dub. Would I fall foul of YouTube’s harshest treatment of videos with copyright music on them and it gets totally removed? I didn’t want to leave this to chance so made an attempt to contact Labi Siffre direct to see if we could get his blessing on its release. That didn’t prove successful so I tried the other angle of contacting the record company who released the recording I used – namely BMG Chrysalis. This proved more painless than I’d expected. After a quick call they asked me to send them the finished video and back came a reply within the hour… “This is something that would fall under YouTube’s ‘user generated content’ blanket license with the music collection societies. Please go ahead!” It does mean that ads get served on the video but, if this in someway compensates the rights owners, then I’m happy.

The video was released on YouTube and Vimeo on the same day (though I know that the Vimeo version might be pulled as they don’t have the same agreements in place as YouTube). Within the first week it had been viewed around 600 times and it’s still rising. I’ve shared it all over the place, and so too have my holiday buddies who have shared it with their friends via Facebook. I’ve also emailed the hotel with it (they do get a fair plug) and included it in a TripAdvisor review of the hotel. On top of that I’ve also tweeted it to various people who have a connection with either the island, hotel group or Labi Siffre.

Thanks

There’s really only a handful of very special people I need to thank for their help and input on the making of this lip-dub and that’s my fellow performers… Tiff, Karen, Kim, Deb, Paul, Mick, Steve and Ricky. I’d also like to thank Labi Siffre for writing and performing the song which will forever remind us of a fantastic holiday shared with some amazing friends. It must be love! xx

Lip-dub cast
My lip-dub performers enjoying an evening meal
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Another team building video assignment

Team building video title
Find out why you need a team building video exercise at your next event

Another team building video assignment

We completed another M&IT Agency Challenge film this week for CAT Publications, at which delegates carry out a team building video exercise consisting of them producing a short promo on one of the presentations held throughout the day.

The whole Video Artisan service includes supplying video shooting kits for the team building video exercises and then editing each team’s film on site – and finally screening the results at the end of the day. In addition, our crew also shoot a background documentary on the event, which includes coverage of the other team building activities and presentations – plus interviews with delegates and sponsors. Not only does this serve as a great documentary of the day but it also acts as a great promotional tool for future events. As with all video content, this will also add to your general search engine visibility.

Team building video activities are beneficial for a number of reasons. Firstly, delegates have to take special care to listen to each presentation as they’ll be expected to know the subjects well in order to produce their film. Secondly, the time restraints placed on them means they have to quickly come up with ideas and work out how they are going to shoot their films and how they are going to be put them together – never losing sight of the fact that they have a story to tell. This helps to develop their leadership skills, their creative thinking and their ability to deliver a product as a team. Thirdly, shooting films is fun, and nothing aids the process of learning as having fun. And of course, the resultant film will act as a permanent reminder of things they have learned.

Team building video Shooting
Team building video exercises make the message stick!

The M&IT Agency Challenge events are certainly a great example of how team building video exercises fit within a learning programme. This is now the third event we have covered for CAT Publications and the feedback from the delegates would suggest that the team building video exercise is an important and enjoyable part of the event.

If your organisation is looking for something new, exciting and adaptable for your next training or presentation event, then we’d be very pleased to talk you through the process of introducing a team building video exercise.

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High-level video communications

Dorchester Abseil
Taking video communications to a new level

Filming internal video communications can often be dull and uninteresting – especially when you are not directly involved in the activity. However, every now and then a video communications job comes in which is rewarding, challenging, exciting and pushes us beyond our usual comfort zone. This job was an excellent example and not only put my filming skills and kit to the test but also tested my nerves and ability to rise (or should I say “descent”) to the challenge.

When Video Communications becomes great PR!

As part of their corporate social responsibility programme, on 20th August The Dorchester Hotel organised a sponsored abseil down the front of their iconic building in London’s Mayfair in aid of Cancer Research. With over 60 members of staff taking part, and under the guidance of abseiling specialists, Eiger Safety, the event was filmed by Video Artisan as a memento for those involved and to provide the hotel with some excellent PR opportunities.

It is not uncommon for an event such as this to pass by unnoticed, but by commissioning a video communications film you get two stabs at gaining as much publicity as possible. This was not only important for the hotel but also for Cancer Research and those members of staff who showed great spirit in making the descent, many of which were taking part in their own time. However, there wasn’t much chance of this event going unnoticed as the abseil was set up on the front of The Dorchester in full view of passers by, guests coming and going from the hotel as well as members of the press who had gathered below.

The right kit for the job

Unlike other video communications jobs this one required some specialist kit to give the viewer a much better view of the action and a sense drama. Apart from the obligatory safety kit (climbing hats, harnesses and other abseiling paraphernalia), Video Artisan had the opportunity to put their latest acquisition to good use – namely a JVC Adixxion Action Camera (GC-XA2BE) which was attached to the climbing hat of the main abseil instructor who was accompanying the volunteers as they descended down the building. The main action filming was carried out using our JVC GY-HM650.

JVC Adixxion
Setting up the JVC Adixxion to film

Having looked at the features and benefits of all the alternative action cameras, Video Artisan chose the JVC Action Camera for a number of reasons. We regularly use the GY-HM650 camera on video communications projects and were looking to add a small POV camera to capture shots that are otherwise impossible. The Dorchester Hotel abseil gave us an excellent opportunity to put the camera to the test and provided us with an abseiler’s view of the activity. Apart from matching nicely with our GY-HM650, one of the main reasons for buying the Adixxion was its robustness. There were lots of opportunities for the camera to get knocked whist the abseilers made the descent down the hotel facia – and the last thing you need to worry about is the camera being damaged or, worst still, being knocked off its mounting and causing a hazard to the crowd below.

We’ve also used the Adixxion on another corporate shoot for a golf tutoring product which required a shot from the golf ball’s perspective (blog coming soon) and it would have been impossible to use anything other than a small POV to achieve this. In the next couple of weeks we’ll also be using the camera’s 5m depth waterproof feature (without the need for any additional housing) on a shoot in the Dominican Republic. With a whole host of mounting options and accessories I can see the Adixxion being used time and time again. The other features that really sold it to me are that it uses a full-sized SD card, has a preview screen built in, can shoot up to 50/60fps in 1920×1080 resolution and has both side and bottom mounting positions.

Keeping video communications safe

There were of course many safety issues to keep in mind throughout the day. The real action was at the top of the climb as the abseilers were prepared to go over the edge, so not only did we have to make sure that I was properly secured but also the main camera and anything attached to it. Filming the climbers’ reactions as they went over was very important, meaning that for much of the time we had to lean right over the edge to catch the action as they made their initial descent.

Keeping it safe
Keeping it safe

 

We also had to film some of the action as they reached the ground (which had its own risks) and meant that we were constantly having to rig and de-rig as we made our way from ground to roof and back again. In these situations it would be very easy to lose sight of your own safety and that of those around you but thankfully the guys at Eiger Safety were keeping a constant eye on all activities whilst making sure it was a great experience for those taking part whilst ensuring that we always had the best shots.

The final challenge

Having witnessed close-up the buzz and excitement throughout the day I simply couldn’t refuse the offer of having a go down the ropes myself. I have worked with Eiger Safety on their promotional video and have filmed in some amazing situations as they carried out their various height-safety services but never actually managed to do any abseiling myself. I can’t honestly say I’m fearful of heights but don’t mind admitting this was outside of my comfort zone. But, having watched so many people who were truly nervous going down for the benefit of others, I couldn’t resist their offer.

Your next video communications project

I like to think I have proved my dedication to helping organisations create excellent video communications – so next time you are doing something which is worth telling others about then I am your man. Any challenge accepted – as long as it is safe!

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